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Gym myths that’ll weaken your workout

 

Every year we hear about the latest and greatest workout trends to hit the gym front. But, year after year, we continue to make some of the same mistakes. Rather than dabbling in poor workout practice, educate yourself on some of the biggest myths to ever make their way into the exercise world:

1. More Crunches Result in Better Abs

This is one of the oldest myths out there, and unfortunately too many people still believe that crunches are the way to washboard abs. The misconception is that abs are made solely in the gym, when in reality there is a whole lifestyle change that need to happen. Not only building muscle but also shredding fat with cardio and a lean diet can get you on your way to a six-pack.

2. Small Weights Optimize Cardio

If you’ve ever taken a spin class, you’ve probably experienced the small weights attached at the bike’s side. They’re said to help you get the most out of your cardio session. But, the truth is that they don’t make much of a difference. To build a lean muscle, a heavier weight that is controlled for 12 to 15 reps for multiple sets will get you better results than extending your cardio endurance with over a minute with a lighter weight.

3. The Hotter the Yoga, the Deeper the Stretch

Bikram yoga has become one of the hottest trends in mind-body exercise. But, there is such a thing as too hot. While the higher temperatures are believed to deepen stretches – and it does loosen you up – you are at a higher risk for injury. This is because you may be unaware of your true flexibility. Plus, exerting yourself in room that is too hot too soon can cause you to become dizzy and nauseous.

4. You Need to Stay in the “Red Zone”

We all like to be tech savvy nowadays. But, not all fitness equipment is made equal. While many heart rate monitors track you in “zones” with the “red zone” often being optimal, more often than not they’re inaccurate. Not to mention, if you’re more focused on what your nifty watch is saying than your workout, you open yourself to a higher risk of injury.