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How to avoid getting seasick on your next cruise

 

Cruising sounds like a fabulous vacation - until you start worrying about the nausea taking over. Once you're seasick, it's hard to escape the feeling and you risk a ruined vacation. The good news is that cruise ships are surprisingly stable, and most people adjust to their sea legs within the first day or two.

If you're still worried about seasickness putting a damper on your cruise, be prepared to combat the nausea before you board. Follow these tips from Cruise Fever and Trip Savvy to avoid getting seasick on cruise ships:

Choose your cabin wisely

If you're sensitive to seasickness, book a cabin in the middle of the ship where you'll feel the least movement. A window is also a must-have, as seeing the water actually helps you maintain equilibrium.

Look forward

When the close quarters of your cabin get too much, head to the decks and get fresh air. Look out over the front of the ship, so your body feels aligned with the direction the ship is moving. Keep your eye on the horizon too. This triggers a familiar reference in your brain so it doesn't resort to motion sickness.

Keep your stomach full

Take advantage of decadent cruise dining and make sure you're not running on an empty stomach. It helps to avoid potentially irritating foods that are spicy or fatty, but everything else is fair game. Drinking lots of water will also prevent seasickness.

Try medicated remedies

Most cruisers take Dramamine and Bonine to prevent seasickness from hitting. Make sure to take some the night before you sail so the medication is already in your system when you board. Scopolamine patches, which look like tiny band-aids worn behind the ear, can also prevent stomachs from turning. However, you'll need to talk to your doctor about getting a prescription for the patches.

Consider natural remedies

Ginger is a miracle spice for preventing nausea. Drinking Ginger Ale helps as long as it's made with real ginger. Otherwise, ginger pills will do the trick. Saltine crackers can also settle your stomach.

With these tactics in mind, you'll be ready to happily sail away sans the seasickness.